How Does Your Vision Change with Age?

How Does Your Vision Change with Age?

How Does Your Vision Change with Age?

How Does Your Vision Change with Age?

How Does Your Vision Change with Age?

Vision changes strike everyone at one point or another. Good vision doesn’t begin immediately at birth. Even in infants, vision develops over time.  When it comes to recognizing objects and colors, it takes time for infants to see what we see. The eyes continually change throughout the decades of time.  You may see noticeable differences in your vision after age 40 and especially after age 60. Even if you have been seeing 20/20 all your life, vision begins to change between 40-60 years of age. You may need prescriptions and certain treatments later in life for vision changes. The best way to keep your eyes healthy through the years is to have frequent eye exams.  Take care of your eyes to prevent conditions such as glaucoma and macular degeneration. To learn more about vision changes throughout the years and how to stay healthy, call us today at Optical Masters!
 

Vision Changes in Children

You might think that children are automatically born with the perfect vision that slowly changes over time, but that’s not exactly accurate. A child’s brain must learn how to use their eyes to see. Developing the ability to detect objects, colors,  faces and more is a process. It doesn’t happen all at once. According to the American Optometric Association, a child’s brain learns how to use their eyes much like they learn to walk or talk--over time and in small stages. Vision changes can continue through age 10.  The infant and childhood years are very important when it comes to monitoring vision. Some of the most crucial stages of vision development happen in the infant stage (between birth and 24 months) and the pre-school vision stage (two to five years of age).

Children are recommended to have their first infant exam at six months of age and then another exam around the age of three.  If vision problems are detected in the first exam, exam frequency may be adjusted.  A child receives exams every two years after the initial exam to monitor vision development. Children who are at risk for vision problems may have to have vision exams more often. Being born prematurely or with a low birth weight can put a child more at risk for vision challenges. Monitoring vision in children is crucial for preventing vision problems.  The brain learns to accommodate different ways to work around bad vision in childhood. This can make vision correction more difficult later on in life.
 

Vision After Age 40

Like children, those between 40-60 years of age should schedule a comprehensive eye exam every two years to monitor vision changes. During this time, vision changes are common. The lens of the eye becomes less flexible, which means that your eye may not be able to focus from objects that are far away to objects that are near. This can happen even if you have had 20/20 vision all your life. Struggling to see objects at close distances is known as presbyopia (or nearsightedness). Around age 60, presbyopia generally stops progressing. You may need to start using contact lenses or eyeglasses during this time period if you notice a change in your vision. Those with high blood pressure or chronic systemic conditions are more at risk for vision changes.  Those with a family history of glaucoma and macular degeneration are also more at risk. Some medications can impair vision.  Work or hobbies that relies heavily on your eyes can put you at risk for vision changes.  Vision changes are very common during this time, so if your changes, we can definitely help you.
 

Vision After Age 60

 After age 60, exams are needed with more frequency.  It is common for the eyes to develop serious vision problems after the age of 60. Preventing serious problems requires paying attention to your diet and the physical condition of your eyes. Vision over 60 tends to have more problems than all of the earlier years. This is especially true if you are in one of the at-risk categories we mentioned. Glaucoma is one such change in vision. Glaucoma is a disease that subtly damages the eye’s optical nerve over time.  It is the leading cause of blindness in people over 60 years of age.  The main reason for this is there are no noticeable symptoms until it has progressed. With frequent eye exams, we can spot glaucoma and control it before it robs you of your sight. Macular degeneration is another common vision problem that we can help control if detected early.

We stress the importance of coming into our office often and receiving frequent comprehensive exams. Vision changes so much throughout childhood and especially after age 40. We want all of our patients to experience an amazing vision throughout their entire life. To stay on top of your vision, schedule your own comprehensive exam today at our Optical Masters office by calling (720) 807-7600.
 

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